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Popping Sorghum Grain 3 Lbs
Popping Sorghum
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 Description
PLEASE NOTE: We are currently out of stock on all sizes of Popping Sorghum. We expect to be back in stock again at the beginning of June 2014. We apologize for any inconvenience.
Please click on the Waiting List button above to be notified when we are back in stock.
Thank you.

Popped sorghum - it's the new super food brought to you in a crunchy, fluffy, super healthy and totally delicious snack.

When popped, sorghum looks and tastes just like miniature premium popcorn, only slightly nuttier and with an awesome crunch.

It's low in calories and fat, gluten free, and best of all, it has no hulls to get stuck in your teeth!

Click on the "Video" tab below for a "How to Pop Sorghum" demo video!
Check out our NEW Hot Air Popper for Popping Sorghum!

AS SEEN ON the Travel Channel's "Bizarre Foods" with Andrew Zimmern!

JustPoppin.com is in no way affiliated with, endorsed by, or sponsored by Travel Channel, Andrew Zimmern, or Bizarre Foods. This video is syndicated here for informational purposes only. We hope you will watch Bizarre Foods and patronize the Travel Channel and its sponsors and advertisers.

This sorghum is not imported, it is grown right here in the US and is not genetically modified (non-GMO). Please support our farmers.
 
 Customer Reviews Write a Review Average Rating review  
4/5
Rating Tastes almost exactly like popcorn!
 
The only way I could get it to pop was using the West Bend Stir Crazy popcorn popper. I used 1/4 cup and a few tablespoons of oil. Yummy, finally have an alternative to popcorn to eat, since I am allergic to corn. I tried popping in a pot on the stove, but couldn't get hardly any to pop. The popcorn popper popped about 90% of the kernels. So happy it worked. I used to be able to eat a large popcorn at the movies and with the Sorghum, 1/4 to a 1/3 cup is plenty when popped. It's more filling than popcorn. Popped Sorghum is very tiny, but delicious.
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Reviewed by:  from Ashburn, VA. - 8/5/2013
4/5
Rating Fun multi-tasker
 

I have enjoyed the popping sorghum as an occasional diversion from popcorn. It certainly makes you eat less, because you have to pop it in small batches. But it tastes great, and is...well, it is just cute. I use a stove top popper, and you don't need a lid, so it is fun to watch. It is just so tiny, like popcorn sized for Barbie (or GI Joe...whatever floats your boat).

Since I've been going through it so slowly, I've tried it in a few recipes in place of other grains. It just needs soaked or simmered, you can use it in place of just about any whole grain.

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Reviewed by:  from Keizer, OR. - 6/21/2013
4/5
Rating Yum
 
We really like the nutty flavor, and the no husks. do not miss popcorn at all.,and a 3lb bag goes a long way.
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Reviewed by:  from orlando florida. - 6/15/2013
1/5
Rating Sorghum
 
Pay close attention to the size and details on this Sorghum product. It is very very very small, and only about 60% actually pops. It is one big waste of money.Just threw 3 lbs of it in the trash.

[Note from Just Poppin: Make sure to check out the photos showing the size comparison between popcorn and sorghum on the sorghum product pages. It IS tiny.
You should see between 60% - 70% pop ratio, however with some fine tuning, you can easily get up to 90%. Any unpopped grains end up toasted and crunchy like corn nuts]
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Reviewed by:  from West Palm Beach,FL. - 5/27/2013
2/5
Rating Popping Sorghum review
 
I was excited to try the Popping Sorgum. While the taste of the sorghum was not bad, I have to say I was very disappointed. It is way, way to small for me. I should have looked more at the information that was provided on the website to see how small it was. I bought a 3 pound bag which would take forever to use, I am going to see if it is safe to feed birds. Maybe offering a small sample pack for customers would be a good idea for this product. On the plus side, the products I ordered arrived very quick. Company has excellent Customer Service.
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Reviewed by:  from Saugus, MA . - 4/18/2013
5/5
Rating sorghum grain for popping
 
I have been unable to eat popcorn for many years. Love it and miss it. I have tried the sorghum popped grain and as long as I am careful can eat it. I purchased a popper and grain and so far very happy. I have to learn the correct amount to pop to avoid so many old maids but will keep at it. My next purchase is sure to be the strainer.
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Reviewed by:  from east otis ma. - 2/14/2013
5/5
Rating No more missing popcorn
 
So happy to not only have found this alternative to popcorn. I actually like it better, and because it's smaller, and I pop it in small quantities, I don't over eat at snack time. YUM
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Reviewed by:  from Massachusetts. - 1/24/2013
5/5
Rating Great Sorghum Snack!
 
This is an unexpected answer to my loss of being able to eat popcorn due to allergies. Popped sorghum is very good - it's my new favorite snack! It tastes a lot like popcorn. I find it more filling than popcorn (comparing equal volumes). I have had much better luck popping it at a bit higher temperature than recommended. Try it...if you like popcorn, you'll like sorghum too.
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Reviewed by:  from Buckley, WA. - 1/22/2013
5/5
Rating sorghum
 
This stuff is nothing short of awesome in flavor, prep and presentation. Easier and more fun to eat. HULLESS or at least not invasive like popcorn. Non popped kernels are good too.
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Reviewed by:  from ca. - 10/17/2012
5/5
Rating Corn Allergy Success!
 
I've had a corn allergy all my life so popcorn (which I love, but it hates me) was causing me grief every time we'd go to the movies or pop it at home. Even the fumes while popping corn would force me out of the house. Not so with sorghum! This stuff is a corn-allergy-sufferer's dream come true! I only recently went entirely corn-free for health reasons and the kids have been badgering me to make popcorn... now they can have their snack, and I can too. Plus they pop up SO CUTE! I feel like a giant. And the unpopped kernels just get crunched up without a thought. I'm going to see if I can come up with a substitute for corn syrup to make pop-sorghum-balls for Halloween treats this year. :)
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Reviewed by:  from Rio Vista, Texas. - 10/16/2012
5/5
Rating Delicious & fun to eat
 
First-time sorghum kernel popper - - and I have to say, they actually are quite delicious. The unpopped kernels were not a problem at all; the simply toasted at the bottom of the pan & became part of the eating experience. The taste is somehow lighter than corn, yet filling.
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Reviewed by:  from North Carolina. - 8/1/2012
5/5
Rating sorghum
 
Lets see all I can say is that it has brought joy back to my life. When I developed a corn allergy early in lfe I never thought Id get to eat a yummy salty snack again,,,,,but,,after seeing Andrew Zimmerns segment on it I finally tracked it down. It is soooooo wonderful,,,thank you. Footnote,,,last night I went to a talk with Andrew here in Toledo,,,and thanked him in person. I will send for more when I run out,,,,thanx Kay
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Reviewed by:  from toledo ohio. - 5/2/2012
5/5
Rating Love this snack!
 
My favorite snack of all-time is popcorn. However, developed a food intolerance to it over the years. Tried to sorghum as an alternative and love it! Pops well. Tastes like the 'old maids' popcorn without the hard kernal and holds the flavor of the salt or cheese you put on it well. Major plus point is I can eat it without indigestion and bloating!
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Reviewed by:  from St. Louis, MO. - 4/17/2012
5/5
Rating Popping Sorghum
 
My 5 yr old grand-son tried the baby popcorn and said, "goodness that's good!" My family loves it too. Thanks!
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Reviewed by:  from Fairview, TN. - 9/10/2010
The following is a Paper from the USDA Agricultural Research Service. The original Paper can be found here.

Sorghum Foods: New Health Benefits from An Ancient Grain

Authors:
Chung, Okkyung
Bean, Scott
Park, Seok Ho

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2004
Publication Date: October 15, 2004
Citation: Chung, O.K., Bean, S.R., and Park, S.H. 2005. Sorghum foods: New health benefits from an ancient grain. Food Science Journal (Chinese) 25:431-437.

Interpretive Summary: Sorghum is an ancient, drought resistant cereal grain grown around the world. In the U.S., sorghum ranks third between wheat and maize in production. Sorghum is grown primarily from southern Nebraska to Texas, with Kansas being the number one sorghum producing state. While, sorghum has traditionally been used as animal feed in the U.S., ~40% of worldwide production is used for human consumption.

Recent research has shown that sorghum may have several components that could impact human health. Some sorghum lines, those containing a pigmented testa, are high in anti-oxidants; some lines higher even than blueberries. In addition, the wax surrounding the sorghum grain contains compounds, policosanols, that may have an impact on human cardiac health. Research is showing that these compounds can lower cholesterol. In addition to these benefits, sorghum is also a gluten free food and is therefore safe for persons with celiac disease. This paper reviews these potential health benefits of sorghum and their potential for increasing utilization of sorghum.

Technical Abstract: Sorghum is an ancient grain first domesticated in Africa and spread to other parts of the world around 3000 B.C. Sorghum is a drought-resistant cereal grain, often growing in semi-arid conditions where other cereal grains cannot. World sorghum production was 54.5 million metric tons (mmt) in 2002. Annually the U.S. produces 13-15 mmt, of which 30-50% is exported. While sorghum has traditionally been used primarily as animal feed in western countries, nearly 40% of the world sorghum production is used for human food in Africa, India, etc.

In the U.S., white food-grade hybrids are being used for the production of wheat-free foods for persons with celiac disease, who cannot consume wheat or related cereal grains such as rye and barley due to intolerance to gluten proteins. They provide relatively bland, white flour that can be used to produce numerous wheat-free food products. As sorghum lacks gluten, sorghum flour cannot produce visco-elastic dough, thus, a batter-type formulation is used to produce sorghum products including bread, waffles, noodles, and pizza crust, which are typically made from wheat. Research has shown that some sorghum lines produce higher quality foods, thus sorghum may be bred for improved product quality.

Recent research also shows that this ancient grain may have unique health benefits, due to high anti-oxidant levels related to their polyphenolic compound and sorghum wax, containing policosanols, which may be important in cardiac health. A challenge for people with celiac disease is supplying steady healthy staple foods, especially in the western world where wheat products are a major staple food.

Therefore, the ancient grain sorghum has drawn new interest and has promise as an important cereal grain in the 21st century due to:
(a) potential staple foods for people with celiac disease;
(b) high anti-oxidants and wax levels for nutritional and health claims; and
(c) the drought resistant nature of sorghum and good production with limited water due to the anticipated exponential growth of the human population in the 2030's.
  • 100% Whole Grain
  • Gluten Free
  • Low in Calories and Fat
  • High in Anti-oxidants
  • Contains Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium & Iron
  • Slowly Digested, Excellent for People with Diabetes
  • May Improve Cardiac & Digestive Health
  • Lowers Cholesterol
  • NO HULLS
  • non-GMO
The Sorghum popping method* is similar to our “Best Home Popping Method” for popcorn. Add the oil and a few kernels (grains) to your popper and heat at medium-high. When those first grains pop, you can add the rest. Now turn the heat down to medium. Popping sorghum is a more delicate process than popping popcorn. (You may have to refine these steps for your stove and popper.) In moments, the popping will begin!

About 60% of the grains will pop.

We recommend popping ¼ to ½ Cup at a time using the following proportions:
  • ¼ cup Sorghum w/ 2 teaspoons oil; or
  • ½ cup Sorghum w/1 tablespoon oil.
  • Just like popcorn, you can add salt or Flavacol butter flavored salt to the popper with the grains.
  • Sift popped sorghum through the Sorghum Sifter to remove any un-popped grains
Store your Sorghum in an airtight container in a cool dark place. NEVER put sorghum grains in the refrigerator or freezer.

*We do not recommend attempting to pop Sorghum in a hot air popper. Trust us. You REALLY don’t want to do it. Check out our NEW Hot Air Popper for Popping Sorghum!
 

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